Put the “Tactical” in your 10/22!

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Looking to add some sizzle to your Ruger 10/22? Green Mountain Rifle Barrel has the solution.

by the ShootingDaily staff

No serious rimfire rifle discussion takes place among firearm enthusiasts that isn’t dominated by the Ruger 10/22. The 10/22 is, hands down, the most popular .22 rifle in America, and has been since its introduction in the mid-1960s.This lightweight carbine quickly became known for its out-of-the-box accuracy, ingeniously simple design, and reliability, and it still holds that distinction today in spite of the many model variations that have come and gone over the years.

One of the great things about the Ruger 10/22 platform that appeals to rimfire fans is that it’s “customizer-friendly.” With only one action screw securing it to the stock, a barrel that simply unbolts from the receiver, and a trigger assembly that literally drops out with the removal of a couple of pins, the 10/22 practically begs for fine-tuning upgrades. One of the best upgrades you can make is to replace the stock barrel with high-quality aftermarket steel. In that arena, Green Mountain Rifle Barrel (GMRB) leads the pack.

Green Mountain Rifle Barrel’s 16-inch blued Classic Military Finned barrel is a must-have for the 10/22 fan who is looking for something completely different. Boasting GMRB’s well-known precision manufacturing and quality materials, a ribbed profile for improved cooling and “throwback” looks, and features a machined Cutts compensator with an integral hooded front sight.
Green Mountain Rifle Barrel’s 16-inch blued Classic Military Finned barrel is a must-have for the 10/22 fan who is looking for something completely different. This barrel boasts GMRB’s well-known precision manufacturing and quality materials, a ribbed profile for improved cooling and “throwback” looks, and features a machined Cutts compensator with an integral hooded front sight.

 

GMRB, known as a leading manufacturer of precision, competition-grade rifle barrels covering everything from muzzleloaders to M16s and AKs, offers several options for the Ruger 10/22 fan. GMRB’s 10/22 barrel lineup includes stainless steel .920 target bull barrels, military-style replacements, weighted target barrels, fluted barrels, and sporter barrels in lengths ranging from 16 to 28 inches. Muzzle threading is also an available option for those looking to add a custom compensator, flash hider, or suppressor.

We had a Ruger 10/22 50th Anniversary model on hand that was begging for a facelift and a little “punch” in the accuracy department. Its black synthetic stock and LaserMax sight seemed cool at the time we bought it, but after perusing the many GMRB options available, we knew we could do better.

The slickest option was the 16-inch blued Classic Military Finned barrel with sights. This barrel comes with a 1:16 twist, a machined Cutts compensator, and Williams military-style sights (hooded front post and adjustable rear aperture). In addition to this unusual barrel profile, GMRB also offers a natural walnut stock designed specifically for their military themed 10/22 barrels. Now this combination would certainly transform our rifle both in looks and in function.

GMRB developed a solid walnut stock specifically for its military themed 10/22 rifle barrel profiles. The stock comes fully inletted with a comfortable rubber pad. We felt this was the perfect match-up for the GMRB 16-inch finned barrel.
GMRB developed a solid walnut stock specifically for its military themed 10/22 rifle barrel profiles. The stock comes fully inletted with a comfortable rubber pad. We felt this was the perfect match-up for the GMRB 16-inch finned barrel.

 

The problem was, GMRB also offers 16-inch M4-style barrel that is fluted to reduced weight and to promote heat dissipation, and it comes with a threaded muzzle ready to accept a 1/2×28-inch compensator.

Decisions, decisions.

Well, the heck with decisions. When you can’t choose between Cookies & Cream and Rocky Road…get both! And that’s exactly what we did.

 

REPLACING THE RUGER 10/22 BARREL & STOCK

The Ruger 10/22 is one of the simplest, easy-to-work-on rimfire rifle platforms there are: two screws secure the barrel to the action, and one screw secures the barreled action to the stock. Factory models come with a barrel band at the end of the foregrip, but serious shooters often remove the band to prevent interference with the barrel’s harmonics.

Here’s how it’s done…

Ensure that the rifle is rendered safe by removing the magazine, opening the bolt, and inspecting the chamber to make sure there are no life rounds in the chamber or action. Remove the barrel band at the end of the foregrip. The barrel band on our rifle was integrated into the LaserMax sight. (RIGHT) Center the fire control switch in the center of the trigger assembly. This provides the necessary clearance to remove the stock from the barreled action.
Ensure that the rifle is rendered safe by removing the magazine, opening the bolt, and inspecting the chamber to make sure there are no live rounds in the chamber or action. Remove the barrel band at the end of the foregrip. The barrel band on our rifle was integrated into the LaserMax sight. (RIGHT) Center the fire control switch in the center of the trigger assembly. This provides the necessary clearance to remove the stock from the barreled action.

 

Unscrew the action screw until the threads release from the action, but completely remove the action screw from the stock. (RIGHT) Carefully separate the stock from the barreled action.
Unscrew the action screw until the threads release from the action, but do not completely remove the action screw from the stock. (RIGHT) Carefully separate the stock from the barreled action.

 

Use a 1/8-inch punch to push out the two trigger assembly retaining pins and the larger bolt stop pin. These may fall out on their own. (RIGHT) Remove the trigger assembly from the receiver. Be careful that the trigger pivot pin does not fall out.
Use a 1/8-inch punch to push out the two trigger assembly retaining pins and the larger bolt stop pin. These may fall out on their own. (RIGHT) Remove the trigger assembly from the receiver. Be careful that the trigger pivot pin does not fall out.

 

Pull back on the charging handle and lift out or drop the bolt from the receiver. (RIGHT) Remove the charging handle through the ejection port.
Pull back on the charging handle and lift out or drop the bolt from the receiver. (RIGHT) Remove the charging handle through the ejection port.

 

The barrel is secured to the receiver with two hex-head screws and a V-block. Remove the two screws, (RIGHT) then remove the V-block from the receiver.
The barrel is secured to the receiver with two hex-head screws and a V-block. Remove the two screws, (RIGHT) then remove the V-block from the receiver.

 

Separate the barrel from the receiver. Ours took some pulling and twisting to remove, but most usually separate easily. (RIGHT) The disassembled components and the new GMRB 16-inch ribbed barrel ready for installation.
Separate the barrel from the receiver. Ours took some pulling and twisting to remove, but most usually separate easily. (RIGHT) The disassembled components and the new GMRB 16-inch ribbed barrel ready for installation.

 

Lightly lubricate the receiver and barrel mating surfaces, and then insert the barrel into the receiver. Align the V-block notch in the barrel parallel to the receiver. (RIGHT) Install the V-block over the barrel notch and onto the receiver, and then install the two hex screws. Lightly snug the screws. Grasp the receiver in one hand and the barrel in the other and twist back and forth to ensure that the barrel is seated properly in the receiver. When properly seated, complete tightening the retaining screws.
Lightly lubricate the receiver and barrel mating surfaces, and then insert the barrel into the receiver. Align the V-block notch in the barrel parallel to the receiver. (RIGHT) Install the V-block over the barrel notch and onto the receiver, and then install the two hex screws. Lightly snug the screws. Grasp the receiver in one hand and the barrel in the other and twist back and forth to ensure that the barrel is seated properly in the receiver. When properly seated, complete tightening the retaining screws.

 

Reinstall the charging handle into the receiver. (RIGHT) Here is the tricky part. You must pull back on the charging handle far enough to align with its corresponding slot in the top of the bolt, and then insert the bolt into the receiver, making sure to mate it correctly with the charging handle. It may take a few tries to get it in, so be patient. Once the bolt is correctly installed, check to make sure that when the bolt is closed, the extractor fits evenly in its corresponding slot in the barrel. If the extractor does not align with its slot in the barrel, or hits one or the other side of the barrel extractor slot, you will need to loosen the barrel screws and rotate the barrel until you achieve proper bolt extractor alignment, and then retighten the barrel screws.
Reinstall the charging handle into the receiver. (RIGHT) Here is the tricky part. You must pull back on the charging handle far enough to align with its corresponding slot in the top of the bolt, and then insert the bolt into the receiver, making sure to mate it correctly with the charging handle. It may take a few tries to get it in, so be patient. Once the bolt is correctly installed, check to make sure that when the bolt is closed, the extractor fits evenly in its corresponding slot in the barrel. If the extractor does not align with its slot in the barrel, or hits one or the other side of the barrel extractor slot, you will need to loosen the barrel screws and rotate the barrel until you achieve proper bolt extractor alignment, and then retighten the barrel screws.

 

Reinstall the trigger assembly into the receiver and secure with the trigger pins. Reinstall the trigger assembly retaining pins and the bolt stop pin. (RIGHT) Making sure the fire selector button is centered in the trigger assembly, install the stock onto the barreled action.
Reinstall the trigger assembly into the receiver and secure with the trigger pins. Reinstall the trigger assembly retaining pins and the bolt stop pin. (RIGHT) Making sure the fire selector button is centered in the trigger assembly and then install the stock onto the barreled action.

 

Tighten the action screw to secure the stock to the barreled action. (RIGHT) Double-check to ensure that the bolt extractor cleanly engages the slot in the barrel. Finally, perform a function check. Pull back on the charging handle to ensure the bolt moves freely in the receiver and cocks the hammer. Move the fire selector to SAFE and pull back on the trigger. The trigger should not move and the hammer should not fall. Move the fire selector to FIRE and pull back on the trigger. The trigger should move rearward and you should hear the hammer fall.
Tighten the action screw to secure the stock to the barreled action. (RIGHT) Double-check to ensure that the bolt extractor cleanly engages the slot in the barrel. Finally, perform a function check. With the rifle pointed in a safe direction and having checked to ensure there are no rounds in the chamber or receiver, pull back on the charging handle to ensure the bolt moves freely in the receiver and cocks the hammer. Move the fire selector to SAFE and pull back on the trigger. The trigger should not move and the hammer should not fall. Move the fire selector to FIRE and pull back on the trigger. The trigger should move rearward and you should hear the hammer fall.

 

The GMRB 16-inch blued Classic Military Finned barrel comes with a Williams rear sight. To install, remove your existing rear sight or base assembly (or, as in our case, the blank screws) from the receiver. (RIGHT) Install the new Williams sight.
The GMRB 16-inch blued Classic Military Finned barrel comes with a Williams rear sight. To install, remove your existing rear sight or base assembly (or, as in our case, the blank screws) from the receiver. (RIGHT) Install the new Williams sight.

 

Windage and elevation adjustments on the Williams sight involve moving the aperture up or down (elevation) or the sight left or right (windage) with a flat-blade screwdriver.
Windage and elevation adjustments on the Williams sight involve moving the aperture up or down (elevation) or the sight left or right (windage) with a flat-blade screwdriver.

 

With the barrel and stock swap complete, our Ruger 10/22 had an entirely new personality with its “military-inspired” theme. The rifle is surprisingly light at 4.5 pounds, with an overall length of only 34.75 inches. With the addition of a sling, this will be our go-to rifle for summer varmint hunting this summer and small-game hunting this fall.

GMB ribbed 3-4

Green Mountain Rifle Barrel recommends a specific 100-round break-in process for their barrels. This involves shooting five rounds, cleaning the barrel, then shooting another five rounds and so on for a total of six five-round strings. Next comes seven 10-round shoot-and-clean strings for a total of 100 rounds. After this, the barrel is sufficiently seasoned to begin ammo testing and final sight-in.

fluted barrel

If you like the military look for your 10/22, another option offered by Green Mountain Rifle Barrel is their 16-inch M4-Type Fluted barrel with a matte blue finish. This barrel combines the M4 barrel profile, but with the forward portion of the barrel fluted for reduced weight and improved cooling (compared to a conventional round profile barrel). It also comes with a 1/2×28 threaded muzzle to accommodate a compensator, flash hider (such as the A2), or a suppressor. This barrel does not come with an open front sight, but if open sights are your thing, it’s an easy matter to install a Picatinny rail gas block (since the barrel has the same .750 diameter as a standard M4-cut barrel) and add a front sight to it. You’ll just need an appropriate-sized riser block for the rear sight to correctly align with the front.

After installing and breaking in the GMRB ribbed barrel, we took it all apart and dropped in the fluted barrel. We opted for a Tactical Solutions compensator, as this presented an easy screw-on fix for our naked muzzle and didn’t require any indexing (but we did have to fill about a 1/8-inch gap with shims). To top it all off, we added an Aimpoint T-1 optic, which will be a good dual-service optic for both small-game hunting and plinking.

GMB fluted 3-4

Now, how’s that for SIZZLE?

GMRB test fire

SOURCE

Green Mountain Rifle Barrel Company

 

Article copyright 2016 by ShootingDaily.com; promoted by Green Mountain Rifle Barrel Co.

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